Being an “American” has two parallel but distinct meanings. I’m what you could call civic American. I look at America as a whole, a melting pot of distinct cultures and traditions that are unified in the notion that the “idea of America” is generally a good one. Laws, courts, onion layers of government, checks and balances, voting rights, public education, betterment of self and community ,freedom to worship in your religious institution without interference from government, freedom of press and speech in public spaces, that and other things all come together to form American values. So that’s considered “civic nationalism” – a term you don’t hear too often. Parallel to “civic nationalism” is “ethnic nationalism”. Ethnic nationalism promotes a notion of an American that follows common ethnicity, common religions, common families, ancestry, “blood and soil”.

Being an “American” has two parallel but distinct meanings.

I’m what you could call civic American. I look at America as a whole, a melting pot of distinct cultures and traditions that are unified in the notion that the “idea of America” is generally a good one.

Laws, courts, onion layers of government, checks and balances, voting rights, public education, betterment of self and community ,freedom to worship in your religious institution without interference from government, freedom of press and speech in public spaces, that and other things all come together to form American values.

So that’s considered “civic nationalism” – a term you don’t hear too often.

Parallel to “civic nationalism” is “ethnic nationalism”.

Ethnic nationalism promotes a notion of an American that follows common ethnicity, common religions, common families, ancestry, “blood and soil”.

Civic nationalism and ethnic nationalism are usually contrasted with each other, as they’re generally not compatible.

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