Been staying away from brain wavy-waves for decades now for all kinds of reasons but mostly the sheer volume of woo (some of which I believe of course). But, as I’m working to understand this ‘thing’ that’s been driving me nuts for years, I can finally approach waves _a little_ because it’s directly applicable to my area of study: Attention, pace, inhibition of distraction, creativity, Dynamic rhythmic entrainment (but INTERNAL) —- Alpha and attentional suppression First, and in contrast to the earlier notion that alpha synchronization indexes ‘cortical idling’, it is becoming apparent that alpha oscillations indicate that attention is actively suppressing cortical activity related to distractors as a part of the process of focusing attention on important targets. For example, alpha power increases with memory load in the Sternberg memory-scanning task, reflecting the increases in the need to suppress distraction [36]. Moreover, when attention is directed internally towards mental imagery, alpha power at attention-relevant scalp sites is greater than during externally-directed, information-intake tasks, reflecting suppression of external input during the imagery task [37]. Also in this study, when external task load increased, alpha power increased, reflecting the need to suppress competing information sources. — Synchronous neural oscillations and cognitive processes Lawrence M. Ward

Been staying away from brain wavy-waves for decades now for all kinds of reasons but mostly the sheer volume of woo (some of which I believe of course).
 
But, as I’m working to understand this ‘thing’ that’s been driving me nuts for years, I can finally approach waves _a little_ because it’s directly applicable to my area of study: Attention, pace, inhibition of distraction, creativity, Dynamic rhythmic entrainment (but INTERNAL)
 
—-
Alpha and attentional suppression
 
First, and in contrast to the earlier notion that alpha synchronization indexes ‘cortical idling’, it is becoming apparent that alpha oscillations indicate that attention is actively suppressing cortical activity related to distractors as a part of the process of focusing attention on important targets.
 
For example, alpha power increases with memory load in the Sternberg memory-scanning task, reflecting the increases in the need to suppress distraction [36].
 
Moreover, when attention is directed internally towards mental imagery, alpha power at attention-relevant scalp sites is greater than during externally-directed, information-intake tasks, reflecting suppression of external input during the imagery task [37].
 
Also in this study, when external task load increased, alpha power increased, reflecting the need to suppress competing information sources.
 
Synchronous neural oscillations and
cognitive processes
Lawrence M. Ward

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