“Be aware of your own participation and its powerful effects on any data and conclusions you may reach”

Actually yes it was the social side that was more interesting, not the individual development isolated. [it’s been a long time tongue emoticon ]

I think many of the studies (perhaps most) done with children weren’t so much “child psychology” that answered what they set out to, but were rather:

“How children react to an unknown authority figure asking questions and doing tests.”

The part of child psych that I liked was observation and lightweight engagement.

There was a nursery school that had an observation booth (it was/is an experimental nursery school if I remember right) – they believed in minimal intervention.

Anyway, as students, we sat behind the glass and simply observed, taking notes. No interference, no engagement.

We did other studies that involved engagement but the lesson of “Be aware of your own participation and its powerful effects on any data and conclusions you may reach” was set firmly in me.

It affects how I deal with people generally now. I’m not an impartial observer in any situation; it’s impossible to be. It’s also impossible _not_ to influence the outcome in some fashion. But as long as there’s awareness of one’s social influence to some degree, it can make up for it somewhat at least smile emoticon

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


five + = 10

Leave a Reply