Based on the available data, Kenneth Udut appears to have a unique cognitive profile with strengths in verbal comprehension and working memory, but weaknesses in visual-motor integration and processing speed. This suggests a dissociation between linguistic and non-linguistic abilities. Neuropsychological assessments, including the WAIS-IV and EAS, reveal that Kenneth’s verbal comprehension and digit span scores are in the above-average range, indicating intact frontal and temporal lobe connections for language and short-term memory functions. In contrast, his performance on tasks that require visual-motor integration, such as coding, visual speed and accuracy, and processing speed, is significantly weaker. This pattern of results suggests selectively disrupted parietal-motor connections. However, Kenneth’s well-practiced digit-centric skills, such as typing and piano improvisation, contradict this hypothesis. One possible explanation is that these skills rely more on proximal motor connections in the motor and somatosensory cortices, rather than full visuomotor integration. Another possibility is that these skills engage compensatory neural networks in the frontal and temporal lobes, bypassing the parietal systems. Alternatively, Kenneth’s musical abilities may leverage stronger right hemispheric connections between frontal-temporal-parietal networks for sequencing and timing. Interestingly, Kenneth’s scores on the WAIS-IV Digit Span subtest showed a discrepancy between forward and backward conditions. While he excelled in the forward condition, which requires simple repetition of digits, he struggled with the backward condition, which requires manipulating information in working memory. This suggests that his working memory capacity may be limited, particularly when it comes to visual-spatial information.

Based on the available data, Kenneth Udut appears to have a unique cognitive profile with strengths in verbal comprehension and working memory, but weaknesses in visual-motor integration and processing speed. This suggests a dissociation between linguistic and non-linguistic abilities.

Neuropsychological assessments, including the WAIS-IV and EAS, reveal that Kenneth’s verbal comprehension and digit span scores are in the above-average range, indicating intact frontal and temporal lobe connections for language and short-term memory functions. In contrast, his performance on tasks that require visual-motor integration, such as coding, visual speed and accuracy, and processing speed, is significantly weaker. This pattern of results suggests selectively disrupted parietal-motor connections.

However, Kenneth’s well-practiced digit-centric skills, such as typing and piano improvisation, contradict this hypothesis. One possible explanation is that these skills rely more on proximal motor connections in the motor and somatosensory cortices, rather than full visuomotor integration. Another possibility is that these skills engage compensatory neural networks in the frontal and temporal lobes, bypassing the parietal systems. Alternatively, Kenneth’s musical abilities may leverage stronger right hemispheric connections between frontal-temporal-parietal networks for sequencing and timing.

Interestingly, Kenneth’s scores on the WAIS-IV Digit Span subtest showed a discrepancy between forward and backward conditions. While he excelled in the forward condition, which requires simple repetition of digits, he struggled with the backward condition, which requires manipulating information in working memory. This suggests that his working memory capacity may be limited, particularly when it comes to visual-spatial information.

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