Aspect > Dimension > Facet > Subfacet > Sub-subfacet > Sub-sub-subfacet > Sub-sub-sub-subfacet

You can use a concise notation to represent the hierarchy with separators that can be easily interpreted by an external program. One common approach is to use a tree-like structure with a designated symbol as a separator between levels.

A simple and efficient notation could be using the “>” symbol as a separator. Here’s an example of a hierarchy with all levels, including the sub-sub-sub-subfacet:

Aspect > Dimension > Facet > Subfacet > Sub-subfacet > Sub-sub-subfacet > Sub-sub-sub-subfacet

To provide a more concrete example, consider the following hierarchy related to the “Space” aspect:

Space > Size > Magnitude > Relative Magnitude > Planetary Scale > Earth’s Diameter > Equatorial vs Polar

In this example:

“Space” is the Aspect.
“Size” is the Dimension.
“Magnitude” is the Facet.
“Relative Magnitude” is the Subfacet.
“Planetary Scale” is the Sub-subfacet.
“Earth’s Diameter” is the Sub-sub-subfacet.
“Equatorial vs Polar” is the Sub-sub-sub-subfacet.
Using this notation, you can create a compact string that represents the complete hierarchy while also being easily parsed by an external program. The program can split the string using the “>” separator and process each level accordingly.

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