animacy, perception – fixed point theorems as formalization of human visual perception? “the combination of two extremely simple, highly perceptible motions (change in speed and change in direction) can produce an impression of animacy, even when presented in a featureless background. Follow-up experiments suggest that this extremely simple motion path might convey intentionality despite the absence of a goal or context; if a single static dot is added to the backgrounds of these displays, the strength of the animacy percept depends upon the location of the dot” — [demo: Examples of the three particle types used in displays created by Tremoulet and Feldman to investigate the minimal conditions for perceptual animacy. The particles’ motion paths were short and uncomplicated: initially, a particle moved in a random direction at a constant speed for 375 ms, then it simultaneously changed both speed and direction, and continued at the new speed in the new direction for another 375 ms. Three different particle types were compared] –ken’s thought- perception of animacy, foreground/background perception – [could perceptual quirks mean conceptual quirks? A single fixed point sounds familiar – fixed-point theorems in mathematics and all the changes that happens when you allows but a single fixed point]

animacy, perception – fixed point theorems as formalization of human visual perception?
 
“the combination of two extremely simple, highly perceptible motions (change in speed and change in direction) can produce an impression of animacy, even when presented in a featureless background.
 
Follow-up experiments suggest that this extremely simple motion path might convey intentionality despite the absence of a goal or context; if a single static dot is added to the backgrounds of these displays, the strength of the animacy percept depends upon the location of the dot”
[demo: Examples of the three particle types used in displays created by Tremoulet and Feldman to investigate the minimal conditions for perceptual animacy. The particles’ motion paths were short and uncomplicated: initially, a particle moved in a random direction at a constant speed for 375 ms, then it simultaneously
changed both speed and direction, and continued at the new speed in the new direction for another 375 ms. Three
different particle types were compared]
–ken’s thought-
perception of animacy, foreground/background perception – [could perceptual quirks mean conceptual quirks? A single fixed point sounds familiar – fixed-point theorems in mathematics and all the changes that happens when you allows but a single fixed point]

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