Ah yes, that’s Donna Haraway. Author of Cyborg Manifesto. Cyborg Manifesto was written in 1983-ish I think – very very ahead of her time there. But this text, 1989, gender critical was just starting to get its feet wet. I went to the most liberal arts of liberal arts colleges in 1990-91 – couldn’t afford to finish. Hampshire College – the hippiest of hippie schools. So this kind of thinking made sense to me. We had unisex bathrooms, safe-spaces, I knew people that were “otherkin” (predecessor of furries – they were elfenkind) and knew a couple of people that used Xe and xhe pronouns, and so all the stuff that showed up in society 20 years after I went to college was all familiar territory to me.

Ah yes, that’s Donna Haraway. Author of Cyborg Manifesto. Cyborg Manifesto was written in 1983-ish I think – very very ahead of her time there.
But this text, 1989, gender critical was just starting to get its feet wet.
I went to the most liberal arts of liberal arts colleges in 1990-91 – couldn’t afford to finish. Hampshire College – the hippiest of hippie schools.
So this kind of thinking made sense to me. We had unisex bathrooms, safe-spaces, I knew people that were “otherkin” (predecessor of furries – they were elfenkind) and knew a couple of people that used Xe and xhe pronouns, and so all the stuff that showed up in society 20 years after I went to college was all familiar territory to me.
She still writes on the topic, albeit with less flourish as when she was younger. This is from 2020.

As I’m fluent, I can translate:

Know where you stand. Not everybody stands where you stand.

Situated Knowledges
The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspective
By Donna Haraway

Recent social studies of science and technology, for example, have made available a very strong social constructionist argument for all forms of knowledge claims, most certainly and especially scientific ones. Feminist objectivity is about limited location and situated knowledge, not about transcendence and splitting of subject and object. It allows us to become answerable for what we learn how to see. The alternative to relativism is partial, locatable, critical knowledges sustaining the possibility of webs of connections called solidarity in politics and shared conversations in epistemology. “Passionate detachment” requires more than acknowledged and self-critical partiality. Positioning is, therefore, the key practice in grounding knowledge organized around the imagery of vision, and much Western scientific and philosophic discourse is organized in this way. Situated knowledges are about communities, not about isolated individuals. The only way to find a larger vision is to be somewhere in particular.

https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781003001201-36/situated-knowledges-donna-haraway

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