Ah interesting! So Colin McGinn got it started in modern times, partially based on Thomas Nagal’s “What’s it like to be a bat?” and it was tagged the “new Mysterianism” by someone named Owen Flanagan. — “In philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, cognitive closure is the proposition that human minds are constitutionally incapable of solving certain perennial philosophical problems. Owen Flanagan calls this position anti-constructive naturalism or the “new mysterianism” and the primary advocate of the hypothesis, Colin McGinn, calls it transcendental naturalism acknowledging the possibility that solutions may be knowable to an intelligent non-human of some kind. According to McGinn, such philosophical questions include the mind-body problem, identity of the self, foundations of meaning, free will, and knowledge, both a priori and empirical.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_closure_(philosophy)

Ah interesting! So Colin McGinn got it started in modern times, partially based on Thomas Nagal’s “What’s it like to be a bat?” and it was tagged the “new Mysterianism” by someone named Owen Flanagan.


“In philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, cognitive closure is the proposition that human minds are constitutionally incapable of solving certain perennial philosophical problems.

Owen Flanagan calls this position anti-constructive naturalism or the “new mysterianism” and the primary advocate of the hypothesis,

Colin McGinn, calls it transcendental naturalism acknowledging the possibility that solutions may be knowable to an intelligent non-human of some kind.

According to McGinn, such philosophical questions include the mind-body problem, identity of the self, foundations of meaning, free will, and knowledge, both a priori and empirical.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_closure_(philosophy)

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