A) Is comprise all-purpose word that I’m looking for? It can be a container that contains… 4) (patent law) To include, contain, or be made up of, defining the minimum elements, whether essential or inessential, to define an invention. (“Open-ended”, doesn’t limit to the items listed; cf. compose, which is “closed” and limits to the items listed.) — B) Going from “include” to “contain” on Wordnet: [incorporate,contain,comprise] is an instance of INCLUDE. So is INCLUDE a master word, whatever it’s called? Z) include – LATIN: IN – CLAUDO claudō (present infinitive claudere, perfect active clausī, supine clausum); third conjugation shut, close, lock imprison, confine besiege, blockade limit, restrict so in + clude, “shut in”, limit in, restrict in… Latin include is a bit more expanded just a bit: shut up or in, confine, enclose, imprison, keep in obstruct, hinder; bound, limit, restrain, control close, finish, end (figuratively) include, enclose or insert something, incorporate — So how does it end up as “comprised-of”..? — COMPRISE, IS COMPRISED OF, and INCLUDE: Filling Up Guideline: Use comprise when you mean to “consist of” (as opposed to “are the elements of”). Use include when you are mentioning or listing some or most (rather than all) of the items in a series. Think twice before using is comprised of for anything. The new water ski package comprises [consists of] a pair of Voit skis, a deluxe rope and handle, a ski vest, and (get this!) a shiny MasterCraft ProStar 190 ski boat. or: The new water ski package includes [has, in addition to other things,] a ski vest. But not: The new water ski package is comprised of [should be is composed of] a pair of Voit skis, a deluxe rope and handle, a ski vest, and (get this!) a shiny MasterCraft ProStar 190 ski boat. — so consist? From Middle French consister, from Latin consistō (“stand together, stop, become hard or solid, agree with, continue, exist”), from com- (“together”) + sistō (“I cause to stand, stand”). (obsolete, copulative) To be. (obsolete, intransitive) To exist. (intransitive, with in) To be comprised or contained. (intransitive, with of) To be composed, formed, or made up (of). The greeting package consists of some brochures, a pen, and a notepad. — consist in To have the thing mentioned as the only or most important part. Tolerance consists in respecting other people’s opinions. consist of To be composed or made up of something. The body consists of cells. —– ok so that’s a diff diredction. — self-contained is the hypernym of contained. Ok. so self-contained it is? I think so.

A) Is comprise all-purpose word that I’m looking for? It can be a container that contains…
 
4) (patent law) To include, contain, or be made up of, defining the minimum elements, whether essential or inessential, to define an invention. (“Open-ended”, doesn’t limit to the items listed; cf. compose, which is “closed” and limits to the items listed.)
B) Going from “include” to “contain” on Wordnet:
[incorporate,contain,comprise] is an instance of INCLUDE.
So is INCLUDE a master word, whatever it’s called?
 
Z)
include – LATIN: IN – CLAUDO
 
claudō (present infinitive claudere, perfect active clausī, supine clausum); third conjugation
 
shut, close, lock
imprison, confine
besiege, blockade
limit, restrict
 
so in + clude, “shut in”, limit in, restrict in…
 
Latin include is a bit more expanded just a bit:
 
shut up or in, confine, enclose, imprison, keep in
obstruct, hinder; bound, limit, restrain, control
close, finish, end
(figuratively) include, enclose or insert something, incorporate
 
So how does it end up as “comprised-of”..?
 
COMPRISE, IS COMPRISED OF, and INCLUDE: Filling Up
 
Guideline: Use comprise when you mean to “consist of” (as opposed to “are the elements of”). Use include when you are mentioning or listing some or most (rather than all) of the items in a series. Think twice before using is comprised of for anything.
 
 
The new water ski package comprises [consists of] a pair of Voit skis, a deluxe rope and handle, a ski vest, and (get this!) a shiny MasterCraft ProStar 190 ski boat.
 
or:
 
The new water ski package includes [has, in addition to other things,] a ski vest.
 
But not:
 
The new water ski package is comprised of [should be is composed of] a pair of Voit skis, a deluxe rope and handle, a ski vest, and (get this!) a shiny MasterCraft ProStar 190 ski boat.
 
— so consist?
 
From Middle French consister, from Latin consistō (“stand together, stop, become hard or solid, agree with, continue, exist”), from com- (“together”) + sistō (“I cause to stand, stand”).
 
(obsolete, copulative) To be.
(obsolete, intransitive) To exist.
(intransitive, with in) To be comprised or contained.
(intransitive, with of) To be composed, formed, or made up (of).
The greeting package consists of some brochures, a pen, and a notepad.
 
consist in
To have the thing mentioned as the only or most important part.
Tolerance consists in respecting other people’s opinions.
 
consist of
To be composed or made up of something.
The body consists of cells.
 
—–
ok so that’s a diff diredction.
 
self-contained is the hypernym of contained.
 
Ok. so self-contained it is? I think so.

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