A “God of the gaps” position is not an unreasonable position to take, especially as you delve deeper into one’s understanding of the nature of how things function and the processes of systems.

A “God of the gaps” position is not an unreasonable position to take, especially as you delve deeper into one’s understanding of the nature of how things function and the processes of systems.

It’s why I have to remain agnostic. I can’t say “no” but I can’t say “yes”. Certainty is an emotional state anyway, not that that invalidates it, just pointing it out

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That’s a reasonable answer. I remain agnostic for that reason: I can’t say “Yes” to a God concept and yet, i can’t say “No”.

The never disappearing uncertainties that seem to keep appearing like the gaps while zooming into a Mandelbrot fractal is what keeps me fascinated, agnostic and open minded.

I simply don’t know. So, if someone says, “Yes” to God for it, it’s not unreasonable. If someone else says, “No” for it, that’s also not unreasonable. A compelling argument can be made for either side, depending on one’s inclinations. So, I keep a foot in both camps and neither. Keeps things interesting.

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I think it’s more like “mind-blowing” stuff, those things that make your brain go Bzzt and all you can do is just go, “woah”.

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