“A fundamental goal of this article was to treat imagination as a process rather than as a faculty which is burdened with reification as well as the assumption of modularity and a fixed location in the brain. The active or productive role of imagination as a process can be traced back in Western culture at least to the Ancient Greeks. Nonetheless, we should appreciate the subtle interactions of beliefs and imagination. This was expressed in Baldwin’s dictionary of 1901 (Baldwin, 1901/1960) which defined imagination as ‘‘The general process of having mental images’’ and ‘‘In this sense it seems better to use the terms imaging and imagery’’ (p. 517). This combines the image or representation as a noun with the act of generation. Thus, the image in which we believe is inseparable from the act which produces it. Consider ‘‘cave art’’ or images on the walls of Chauvet Cave from at least 30,000 years ago. In the flickering light of a burning wick, the proto-artist perceived an image in the shadows on the wall and used newly developed materials to preserve and share that image with other tribal members (see Cupchik, 2016). Suggestions on the surface of the illuminated cave wall met connections in the ‘‘artist’s’’ mind. “

“A fundamental goal of this article was to treat imagination as a process rather than as a faculty which is burdened with reification as well as the assumption of modularity and a fixed location in the brain. The active or productive role of imagination as a process can be traced back in Western culture at least to the Ancient Greeks. Nonetheless, we should appreciate the subtle interactions of beliefs and imagination. This was expressed in Baldwin’s dictionary of 1901 (Baldwin, 1901/1960) which defined imagination as ‘‘The general process of having mental images’’ and ‘‘In this sense it seems better to use the terms imaging and imagery’’ (p. 517). This combines the image or representation as a noun with the act of generation.
Thus, the image in which we believe is inseparable from the act which produces it.
Consider ‘‘cave art’’ or images on the walls of Chauvet Cave from at least 30,000 years ago. In the flickering light of a burning wick, the proto-artist perceived an image in the shadows on the wall and used newly developed materials to preserve and share that image with other tribal members (see Cupchik, 2016). Suggestions on the surface of the illuminated cave wall met connections in the ‘‘artist’s’’ mind. “

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