1-bit computing, Feynman’s algorithm, late 1980s massively parallel : the Connection Machine. CM-1. Never learned what came of it but I was mystified.

1-bit computing, Feynman’s algorithm, late 1980s massively parallel : the Connection Machine. CM-1.

Never learned what came of it but I was mystified.

https://web.archive.org/web/20090728072503/http://www.kurzweilai.net/articles/art0504.html?printable=1

“Instead, we planned to connect the processors in a 20-dimensional hypercube so that each processor would only need to talk to 20 others directly. Because many processors had to communicate simultaneously, many messages would contend for the same wires. The router’s job was to find a free path through this 20-dimensional traffic jam or, if it couldn’t, to hold onto the message in a buffer until a path became free. Our question to Richard Feynman was whether we had allowed enough buffers for the router to operate efficiently. “

“Every great man that I have known has had a certain time and place in their life that they use as a reference point; a time when things worked as they were supposed to and great things were accomplished. For Richard, that time was at Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project. “

—–

 

I’m enjoying this article. I didn’t know Feymann wrote a parallel BASIC language.
 
“To find out how well this would work in practice, Feynman had to write a computer program for QCD. Since the only computer language Richard was really familiar with was Basic, he made up a parallel version of Basic in which he wrote the program and then simulated it by hand to estimate how fast it would run on the Connection Machine.
 
He was excited by the results. “Hey Danny, you’re not going to believe this, but that machine of yours can actually do something useful!” “
—–
Feynman’s explanation of cellular automata
 
“We have noticed in nature that the behavior of a fluid depends very little on the nature of the individual particles in that fluid. For example, the flow of sand is very similar to the flow of water or the flow of a pile of ball bearings. We have therefore taken advantage of this fact to invent a type of imaginary particle that is especially simple for us to simulate. This particle is a perfect ball bearing that can move at a single speed in one of six directions. The flow of these particles on a large enough scale is very similar to the flow of natural fluids.”
—–
“Don’t say `reflected acoustic wave.’ Say [echo].” Or, “Forget all that `local minima’ stuff. Just say there’s a bubble caught in the crystal and you have to shake it out.” Nothing made him angrier than making something simple sound complicated.
Really such a good writer.
 
“In retrospect I realize that in almost everything that we worked on together, we were both amateurs. In digital physics, neural networks, even parallel computing, we never really knew what we were doing. But the things that we studied were so new that no one else knew exactly what they were doing either. It was amateurs who made the progress.”
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