0: EMERGENCE Reading a nice Emergency Taxonomy 3.2 Taxonomies for Particles Yaneer Bar-Yam [BarYam04] distinguishes between four types of emergence. He gives the following short description, which is based on “particles” and “ensembles” rather than agents and groups: Type A Emergent Behavior (Micro to macro) Type 0 (Parts in isolation without positions to whole) Type 1 (Parts with positions to whole – weak emergence) Type 2 (Ensemble with collective constraint – strong emergence) Type 3 (System to environment relational property – strong emergence) Type B Dynamic emergence of new types of systems “new emergent forms” Type 0 is simply the “parts isolated vs. parts joined” emergence, similar to benign and nominal forms. Type 1 and Type 2 correspond roughly to the weak and strong emergence, although his notion of strong emergence is a bit idiosyncratic (“A strong emergent property is a property of the system that cannot be found in the properties of the system’s parts or in the interactions between the parts”). For strong emergence, he emphasizes correctly the existence of intermediate components or ensembles between the global level of the system and the local level of the agents. Type 3 classifies the emergent behavior of systems which arise out of the interaction with the environment https://arxiv.org/ftp/nlin/papers/0506/0506028.pdf

0: EMERGENCE
Reading a nice Emergency Taxonomy
 
3.2 Taxonomies for Particles
Yaneer Bar-Yam [BarYam04] distinguishes between four types of emergence. He gives the following short description, which is based on “particles” and “ensembles” rather than agents and groups:
 
Type A Emergent Behavior (Micro to macro)
Type 0 (Parts in isolation without positions to whole)
Type 1 (Parts with positions to whole – weak emergence)
Type 2 (Ensemble with collective constraint – strong emergence)
Type 3 (System to environment relational property – strong emergence)
Type B Dynamic emergence of new types of systems “new emergent forms”
 
Type 0 is simply the “parts isolated vs. parts joined” emergence, similar to benign and nominal forms. Type 1 and Type 2 correspond roughly to the weak and strong emergence, although his notion of strong emergence is a bit idiosyncratic (“A strong emergent property is a property of the system that cannot be found in the properties of the system’s parts or in the interactions between the parts”). For strong emergence, he emphasizes correctly the existence of intermediate components or ensembles between the global level of the system and the local level of the agents. Type 3 classifies the emergent behavior of systems which arise out of the interaction with the environment
 
https://arxiv.org/ftp/nlin/papers/0506/0506028.pdf

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